Improve your animal’s health? with Azomite. A to Z of minerals including trace elements,

Editor note here: I just foind that his page on Animals is not working so here is the main link: http://www.azomiteinternational.com   and I guess you will have to do some looking to find it.  The link worked when I put it up.   If you find links that don’t work here please let me know and if you find them  or the one that works please let me know  Thank you , In service to the King of Kings, Lord of Lords, Yhwh. Ambassador of Yhwh.–

 

http://www.azomiteinternational.com/FAQ/FAQ_Animals.html

Azomite International

A Natural Source of Minerals and Trace Elements

Q: What is AZOMITE®?
Q: What effect does AZOMITE® have in animals?
Q: How is AZOMITE® different typical feed minerals?
Q: Aren’t all the necessary minerals already in the feed?
Q: What is AZOMITE® composed of?
Q: Is AZOMITE® organic?
Q: Where does AZOMITE® come from?
Q: Does AZOMITE® contain heavy metals?
Q: How is AZOMITE® applied to the feed?
Q: How do animals assimilate AZOMITE® in the gut?
Q: What types of animals is AZOMITE® effective on?
Q: Is AZOMITE® a toxin binder?
Q: Is AZOMITE® a zeolite or bentonite?
Q: Will AZOMITE® degrade the quality of feed pellets?
Q: How much AZOMITE® do I need per metric ton?

Q: What is AZOMITE®?

AZOMITE® is a naturally rich trace mineral booster for animals and also a soil re-mineralizer for plants. AZOMITE® is a registered trade name and is an acronym for “A to Z of Minerals Including Trace Elements”.

Q: What effect does AZOMITE® have on animals?

Generally, when AZOMITE® is added to the feed, animals improve average daily lean gain, immune response and feed conversion ratio. AZOMITE® pays for itself and increases profits for animal growers.

Q: How is AZOMITE® different from typical feed minerals?

Most conventional mineral feed mixes only contain about 10 trace elements. Some feed manufacturers neglect all of the “trace” minerals. For animals to complete their life cycle and produce at full potential, a wide range of minerals is necessary; AZOMITE® supplies that essential wide range — “from A to Z”. For a list of the main trace minerals and their functions and benefits to animals, click here.

Q: Aren’t all the necessary minerals already in the feed?

In most cases, no. The world’s cropland has been under cultivation for many decades. With each crop cycle, plants remove trace minerals from the soil or the elements are lost through erosion. Since most fertilizer programs only replace N, P and K, crops become deficient when the soil has been depleted of the trace elements. Most feed ingredients are lacking the full range of minerals that were deficient in the soil. Of course, animals can complete their life cycle without the full range of minerals but they will not produce at their full potential or be healthy and adequately resistant to disease.

Q: What is AZOMITE® composed of?

In an average chemical assay, AZOMITE® contains more than 67 trace minerals which includes many rare earths elements (lanthanides). Many of these elements have been depleted from soils worldwide. For a complete chemical analysis of AZOMITE®, click here.

Q: Is AZOMITE® organic?

Yes. AZOMITE® is certified organic by the Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI) in the United States. AZOMITE® is simply mined, crushed and sold. Nothing is added or altered in any significant way. It is natural and organic in the most basic sense.

Q: Where does AZOMITE® come from?

AZOMITE® is mined from a 30 million year-old volcanic ash deposit located in central Utah, USA. AZOMITE® is classified as a Hydrated Sodium Calcium Alumino-Silicate (HSCAS). Scientists believe that the unique chemical make-up of AZOMITE® is because the ancient volcano spewed ash out its side into a seabed. This combination of seawater, fed by hundreds of rivers rich in minerals, and the rare and abundant minerals present in volcanic ash created the AZOMITE® deposit which is found nowhere else on Earth. For pictures of the AZOMITE® mine, click here.

Q: Does AZOMITE® contain heavy metals?

A: Yes, but in lesser amounts than exists in a typical feed. AZOMITE® is Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) by the US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) and is certified for organic agriculture by the Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI). Remember, AZOMITE® is a product from the Earth, is not chemically altered, and cannot harm the environment.

Q: How is AZOMITE® applied to the feed?

AZOMITE® is processed into a fine powder that is around 200 mesh. This powder is easily added to the feed pre-mix.

 Q: How do animals assimilate AZOMITE® in the gut?

In an animal’s gastric phase, AZOMITE® is exposed to large amounts of hydrochloric acid that likely converts the minerals into chloride salts that are soluble in the gut. Also, the mineral oxides in AZOMITE® may combine with the breakdown products of proteins or carbohydrates in the gut to form “chelates” which are soluble. These natural chelates are readily absorbed into the blood stream where the mineral can be made available and utilized by the animal’s biochemistry.

Q: What types of animals is AZOMITE® effective on?

AZOMITE® has proven results – scientific or anecdotal – in the following species of animal: shrimp, fish, cattle, pig and, poultry. It is not surprising that AZOMITE® should work in many more types of animals because most require the same types of trace elements that the feed is often lacking.

Q: Is AZOMITE® a toxin binder?

Most substances – including the feed itself – have the ability to bind toxins, some better than others. AZOMITE® has been shown to bind toxins present in feed in laboratory tests, however, feed producers use AZOMITE® for its trace elements content, not usually for its toxin-binding ability. In addition, many feed producers do not believe that toxin binders provide any benefit and many studies show that toxin binders (like zeolites) only work in vitro against only one, or a few, mycotoxins!

Q: Is AZOMITE® a zeolite or bentonite?

No. Geologists put AZOMITE® in a very broad class known as a “Hydrated Sodium Calcium Alumino-Silicate” (HSCAS) but it is unique because of its chemical make-up. The physical structure, number and abundance of trace elements in AZOMITE® are distinct from any other deposit. An “HSCAS” is such a non-specific classification of mineral deposit that it is akin to calling a Blue Marlin simply a “fish” – a factual statement, but not precise.

Q: Will AZOMITE® degrade the quality of feed pellets?

No. AZOMITE® is a natural anti-caking agent and does not alter feed pellet quality in any significant way. It may even lower the cost of the feed pelleting process.

Q: How much AZOMITE® do I need per metric ton?

Different feed producers use different amounts but none exceed more than 2% (20 kg/metric ton of feed) or go below 0.25% (2.5 kg/metric ton of feed). Most feed producers use AZOMITE® at 0.5% (5 kg/metric ton of feed) but they may increase or reduce that depending on how much stress the animal is experiencing at a particular moment.

http://www.zetatalk.com/food/tfood34n.htm

Azomite


I found something that might be of interest, Azomite is sold nationwide. The main proprietor is a company called Peak-Minerals located in Missouri. Here’s some info on azomite.

A Source of Minerals & Trace Elements
Azomite is the name of a special rock in Utah. Early this century geological prospector Rollin Anderson found deposits of montmorillonite clay in a valley south of Salt Lake City. U.S. Bureau of Mines analysis showed the clay is similar to Chilean/Peruvian caliche rocks from which much of the world’s nitrate was mined. Anderson ground montmorillonite as fine as possible, then put it in his garden. Results were amazing and nearly immediate. Minerals in Azomite are necessary to optimal metabolism in living things. Ground to dust, minerals are small enough to pass through cell walls of organisms.
 
Azomite is natural mined rock from a specific volcanic deposit in central Utah marketed as a free-flowing, less than 200 mesh, tan to pink powder with a density of 48 lbs./cubic foot. Shipped in bulk ($350/ton) or 40 lb. paper sacks ($19). No additives, synthetics or fillers. Mineralogically, Azomite is rhyolitic tuff breccia. Chemically, it’s hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR 582.2729) lists it as “anti-caking agent.” It’s “generally recognized as safe” (GRAS) by FDA for feeds up to 2% by weight. Odorless, insoluble (1%). Azomite has 67 major and trace elements, so its name means “A to Z Of Minerals Including Trace Elements.” Typical analysis shows every element that’s beneficial to plants and animals, and other elements (micro-nutrients) scientists believe essential. Any contaminants are within American Feed Control Officials guidelines.
 
Azomite was mined since 1942 as soil amendment and livestock feed additive. Cattlemen report faster weight gain, improved feed efficiency, upgraded meat quality, greater disease resistance, reduced mortality. Dairymen report increased milk, higher butterfat. Poultry producers report enhanced egg fertility and shell quality. Crop farmers report improved growth, health, size. Potatoes report 19-60% increase in yield; sugar beets are larger, with higher sugar content. Citrus growers report improved recovery from decline, healthier trees. In 1988 Peak Minerals, Inc. acquired the deposit and initiated accredited research in Colorado, Utah, Florida, and Georgia. Studies in broiler chicken, mycotoxin, citrus, and crops indicate benefits and are available by request. Currently approved for organic farming in California, Colorado, Oregon, and Washington. Research recommends 300-600 lbs./acre broadcast, or 2 lbs./10 sq. ft in gardens. Users are testing row and foliar application.

Offered by Pat.

It seems to be an expensive way (a $19 bag treats 200 sq. feet for one season?) to add elements and their ones we’re concerned about occur only in trace amounts. I believe the increase in yields and growth that the site are primarily from the potassium and calcium (mineralogically speaking).

Offered by Roger.

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