Correcting Our Paradigm

I like this article. I wish my Christian friends would read this. I have had so many conversations with good meaning Christians yet they hold this doctrine that is tottally unsupportable by the Scripture. I do have one issue though with this article and that is the version of the Scripture that is used. For my readers I want to point out the King James Version of the Scripture, ( and I will type it right here) So that the words used can be distinguised from the words in the article. “Galatians three, verse fifteen though eighteen: Brethren, I speak after the manner of men; Thought it be but a man’s covenant, yet if it be confirmed, no man disannulleth, or addeth thereto. No to Abraham and his seed were the promises made. He saith not, And to seeds, as of many; but as of one, And to thy seed, which is Christ. And this I say, that the covenant, tht was confirmed before of God in Christ, the law, which was four hundred and thirty years after, cannot disannul, that it should be of none effect. For if the inheritance be of the law, it is no more of promise: but God gave it to Abraham by promise.” The word Human is not used, Please see the “Power of Words” page, by guest author to distinguish between the words that God uses and the words that man uses. Thank you.

natsab

The correct priority of Scripture is sequential.  We should start at the beginning.  Paul tells us that a later covenant cannot Gs NTscontradict an earlier covenant.  Neither can a later scripture contradict an earlier one.  If there were such a contradiction, it would mean that one of the scriptures was wrong (in which case it isn’t Holy scripture) or that God had changed His mind (in which case He is inconsistent and fallible).  The correct priority of Scripture starts with the Torah.

D. Thomas Lancaster, Restoration, Pg. 52

Christendom’s opinion is precisely opposite the above quote from Lancaster.  I can’t tell you how many times it has been expressed or implied that ‘we can’t understand the Old Testament without the New.’  In fact, the very structure of seminary courses, the pattern of preaching habits and the plethora of theological books reveal that Christendom spends roughly 85% of their time in…

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